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THE GODART PARTICLE & PHOTOPHONICS

The artist is primarily concerned with a conversion of music to light, modes of capturing that light with a photo apparatus and with the application of music theory principles in creating the content and composition of the acoustic photographs. His secondary concern is discovering the Godart particle – the fundamental building block of art.

In order to perform the art process, the artist designed and constructed two fundamental devices: the Q, an optoacustic machine capable of transforming music into beams of light, and the Solfeggio grid, a device which disperses the beams and creates a dynamic optical texture. The Q, Solfeggio grid and the photo apparatus intercommunicate by using a symbolic audiovisual language developed by the artist. This photophonic language is based on the principles of music theory that are transposed to the color theory and combined with methods of photography. It is essential for a proper translation of music to light and for conversion of that acoustic light to a photograph. Once the optical texture is being created following the photophonic syntax, the artist interacts with the process and captures the texture as an abstract photograph.

PHOTOPHONIC LANGUAGE

The artist developed this language primarily to determine a syntax for translating musical notes into colors. The photophonic grammar evolves around the formation of basic colaural sentence (colaural= color + aural) which reveals the colors of a musical composition and their structure. If music is to be translated to light correctly, each sentence has to display quadruple sets of color harmonies and manifest color depth as an occurrence in a three-dimensional space. Basic sentences have the ability to evolve into their advanced counterparts.

The secondary task of the language is to translate note duration into dynamic beams of light and to connect them with translated colors. Once the beams are dispersed on the Solfeggio grid and the acoustic light is created, the language is used to translate music’s tempo and to communicate the transfer of the light to a photo apparatus.